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Ex-Military Releases NASA Video Showing A 3,200 Km Long Spacecraft of Unknown Origin

Bob Dean is a former member of NATO intelligence, high-ranking military man, who has been involved in major UFO research. Today, already retired, he decided to divulge everything he knows to the world. In his newest video, Bob Dean showed images of an alien object about 3200 km long near the planet Saturn in 1980.

A former NASA engineer turned whistleblower, who has claimed that NASA has known about the existence of extraterrestrial life for decades, recently released a video of a long spacecraft. The video has sparked speculation and conspiracy theories amongst viewers.

“There are intelligent races out there that are a billion years ahead of us. We find stars out there that probably have planets, those planets can be up to three times as old as our star.” – Bob Dean
Bob Dean is a former member of NATO intelligence, high-ranking military man, who has been involved in major UFO research. Today, already retired, he decided to divulge everything he knows to the world. In his newest video, Bob Dean showed images of an alien object about 3200 km long near the planet Saturn in 1980.

Recent leaked Russian space program files clearly show the same object as described in 1980.

Robert Dean explains: “In September 2009, the Cassini spacecraft photographed what NASA calls an anomaly, a strange object that they believe moved at will under the control of an intelligence, was metallic and magnetic. It was determined that the ‘object’ measured about 3200 km in length by 800 km in diameter.”

Cassini–Huygens

The Cassini–Huygens space-research mission (/kəˈsiːni ˈhɔɪɡənz/ kə-SEE-nee HOY-gənz), commonly called Cassini, involved a collaboration among NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Italian Space Agency (ASI) to send a space probe to study the planet Saturn and its system, including its rings and natural satellites. The Flagship-class robotic spacecraft comprised both NASA’s Cassini space probe and ESA’s Huygens lander, which landed on Saturn’s largest moon, Titan.[7] Cassini was the fourth space probe to visit Saturn and the first to enter its orbit, where it stayed from 2004 to 2017. The two craft took their names from the astronomers Giovanni Cassini and Christiaan Huygens.

Launched aboard a Titan IVB/Centaur on October 15, 1997, Cassini was active in space for nearly 20 years, with 13 years spent orbiting Saturn and studying the planet and its system after entering orbit on July 1, 2004.[8] The voyage to Saturn included flybys of Venus (April 1998 and July 1999), Earth (August 1999), the asteroid 2685 Masursky, and Jupiter (December 2000). The mission ended on September 15, 2017, when Cassini’s trajectory took it into Saturn’s upper atmosphere and it burned up[9][10] in order to prevent any risk of contaminating Saturn’s moons, which might have offered habitable environments to stowaway terrestrial microbes on the spacecraft.[11][12] The mission was successful beyond expectations – NASA’s Planetary Science Division Director, Jim Green, described Cassini-Huygens as a “mission of firsts”[13] that has revolutionized human understanding of the Saturn system, including its moons and rings, and our understanding of where life might be found in the Solar System.[citation needed]

Cassini‘s planners originally scheduled a mission of four years, from June 2004 to May 2008. The mission was extended for another two years until September 2010, branded the Cassini Equinox Mission. The mission was extended a second and final time with the Cassini Solstice Mission, lasting another seven years until September 15, 2017, on which date Cassini was de-orbited to burn up in Saturn’s upper atmosphere.

The Huygens module travelled with Cassini until its separation from the probe on December 25, 2004; Huygens landed by parachute on Titan on January 14, 2005. It returned data to Earth for around 90 minutes, using the orbiter as a relay. This was the first landing ever accomplished in the outer Solar System and the first landing on a moon other than Earth’s Moon.

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